DIY Sequin Sweater

Cover Sweater

I’ve been itching to do another clothing upcycle/refashion project for the past few months and I finally got around to it this past week! Today I’m excited to share my DIY Sequin Sweater. Yes, I went in to the hubby’s closet again, but to be fair, I’ve never seen him wear this particular sweater/shirt since I’ve known him.


Before Sweater

 

I’ve always stumbled across this shirt when we swap out our clothes as the seasons change. Somehow the hubby has always managed to convince me to keep it. This time I’m glad he did, because it became my guinea pig to refashion into something for myself. My inspiration for this refashion project came from this pin from here I came across on Pinterest: a short sleeve sweater layered over a dress shirt.

I tried on the sweater to see how much fabric I was dealing with. Yes, it looks like I’m swimming in it.

Before Sweater 2

But no worries, I pulled out a  J Crew sweater that I owned which I was going to base my sizing on. Now it was time to get down to measuring and cutting by doing the following:

Bodice:

  1. Lay your sweater on top of the black one, matching both sweaters by the neckline to make sure they are centered.
  2. Mark on both sides with chalk the desired width of the new sweater based on your existing one. Baste or pin both sides and try on the sweater first. For me it was too fitted for my liking the first two times around, so I re-drew my lines out a little wider. Once you’re happy with the width, sew a straight line down both sides with a 1/2″ seam allowance. I then finished the edges with an overcasting stitch to prevent them from fraying.
  3. Cut off the ribbing from the neckline. Fold the edge of the neckline under by 1/2″ and sew it down with a straight stitch.
  4. Cut both sleeves off. Make sure you mark each sleeve for which side it came from.
  5. Cut your arm holes. I made a template for the armholes, by tracing the armhole of my J. Crew sweater and factoring in a 1/2″ seam allowance. Using the template, I cut out the shape of the armhole.
  6. Hem your sweater to the desired length.

Sweater Cutout

Sleeves

  1. Similar to the armholes, I made a sleeve template based on my J. Crew sweater and factoring in a 1/2″ seam allowance to attach them to the bodice. Using the template, I cut out each sleeve from the existing ones. Then attach your sleeves.

Sweater Sleeves

Here’s how the sweater turned out. I was quite nervous when it came to attaching the sleeves, since this was my first time attempting it. To make thing more nerve-wrecking, I chose to make the sleeves gathered at the shoulders so they would look slightly puffed. But it wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be because I got them both right on the first try!

Sweater After 1

I was happy with the way the sweater turned out. However, it looked too plain, like it was missing something. So I went back on Pinterest to look for more ideas. I came across this pin: sequin trim around the neckline! So I went to Joann’s to pick up a pack of gold sequins and some transparent thread.

Sweater Sequins In progress

 

Now here’s how the final product turned out! I LOVE it! The sequins definitely make this sweater stand out. This is going to be a staple in my winter wardrobe and maybe into spring!

Sweater After Final

Sweater After 2

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DIY Peplum-Style Dress Shirt

My husband’s dress shirts always rip at the elbow first without fail. In the past when that happened, the dress shirt became useless to him, and in the trash it went. So sad. Now that I have my sewing machine, I save them to practice my sewing. It’s free fabric for me to mess around with. If I screw up, oh well.

Lately, I had been pinning quite a bit of clothing-related sewing ideas, one of which was a tutorial to transform a men’s dress shirt to a woman’s dress shirt from Cotton&Curls. Considering I had never sewn a single article of clothing before, I thought this project was perfect to try because it only involved deconstructing the shirt, cutting the pieces down to size, and putting it back together. No pattern needed! So here’s the my husband’s dress shirt that was to be my guinea pig. You can see the tear on the left sleeve.

 

Before Picture

The tutorial was pretty easy to follow concept-wise. My lack of experience in sewing clothing is what made this project difficult. But you have to start somewhere, right? There was definitely a learning curve that I had to overcome. I studied the construction of my own dress shirts to understand how the seams were supposed to look on both the inside and outside.  I didn’t take pictures of the process this time around because I just wanted to focus on making it look right. To be honest, I went through several iterations of sewing certain portions of the shirt  at times. To add my own twist, I chose to make the shirt sleeveless since warm weather has finally arrived. I added mini ruffle sleeves as a finishing touch. Here is the finished product!

After

 

I love it, it’s simple and clean. This is a great addition to my spring/summer wardrobe!

front 2

Side

Back

Ruffles

I feel inspired now to make other clothing pieces. My husband better beware,  his shirts might start to go “missing”. =P